Nathan Martinez

NOTE:  Nathan frequently travels to remote areas and often has no access to the internet. He will reply as soon as possible. 

Experience Life with Nathan

In his youth, Nathan identified as an anarcho-primitivist but was often viewed as a notorious contrarian and pariah within the early rewilding and Green Anarchist communities. While the majority relied on romanticized accounts of hunter-gatherers as guidebooks, he drew on his intimate knowledge of the non-human animal world to challenge many baseless assertions. In the process, he experienced a radical mental transformation and developed a worldview that fully embraced all primal drives. Nathan has now long considered himself a total anarchist and animalist -- one who recognizes that humans are animals, emphasizes the importance of family, enjoyment of life and freedom from all forms of viral ideologies, artificial moralities and authorities. He views language and technology as extremely dangerous but not innately "evil" in and of themselves. 

Nathan grew up in a large family on rural land in Colorado and Texas, and along with his siblings, was homeschooled until age 18. He developed an early interest in living off the land after hearing the stories of relatives from south Texas and northern Mexico who utilized wild edible plants and cooked meat in underground pits. Around the same time, he also became fascinated by languages -- he studied Spanish, Chinese and classical Nahuatl and mastered archaic Hebrew at age 16. When not studying, Nathan spent all of his time observing beetles, spiders, ants, birds, squirrels, deer and feral cats. He was not content merely observing nature -- he wanted more than anything to become part of it. 

In his late teens, Nathan readily devoured academic literature on gorillas, chimpanzees and early humans. In college he studied Near Eastern archaeology and history, anthropology, sociology and linguistics and spent his free time replicating hunter-gatherer artifacts, observing captive chimpanzees and reading every ethnography he could get his hands on. In the library, he discovered that he could absorb knowledge at a far greater rate than in the classroom -- and for free. During this time, he discovered the writings of Daniel Quinn and John Zerzan, but quickly realized that their romantic views and impractical solutions were illogical and not substantiated by comparative ethology or the archaeological record. 

At age 19, Nathan spent part of the summer with several First Nations in the Canadian Pacific Northwest -- gathering berries by the bushel and travelling out to sea fishing with other teenagers in very dangerous little boats. After the experience, he knew that he wanted to spend the rest of his life living off the land and sea -- with a large extended family if possible. 

After returning to Texas, Nathan worked as a librarian and manual laborer before finding a job as an experimental archaeological instructor at a remote desert field school, where he instructed students of all ages in primitive technology and optimal foraging theory. He also had access to a large ranch and began subsisting for weeks at a time exclusively on wild game that he hunted and trapped. In between teaching seasons, he traveled from Alaska to the Amazon to test the foraging potential of a diverse number of bioregions and served as a consultant and trainer for prominent internationally televised survival experiments. 

He continued to contemplate the interplay between language and society and conducted extensive personal research in the fields of memetics, neurolinguistics, neuromorphic computing, paleoanthropology, primatology and comparative ethology. 

From the beginning, Nathan was driven by an overwhelming desire to live by hunting and foraging. He initially looked for an existing community of radical subsistence hunters, but found none who were truly living the life that he wanted. He also soon realized that to inspire others, he would have to be the first to take the plunge and immerse himself in the life that others only dreamed and wrote about. After losing work due to the recession, he fulfilled his life-long goal of personally living off the land and is now a full-time subsistence hunter, trapper, forager and artisanal commercial fisherman. He largely disappeared from the public view for 7 years but now feels that the time has come to renew his search for family. 

"The most potent form of anarchy is that of the mind. Those who embrace all aspects of their animal nature experience a freedom that the domesticated and civilized mind cannot comprehend."

-- Nathan Martinez